FAQs and expert advice about wedding & engagement rings

Here is a selection of Q&As from Your Sussex Wedding magazine whether it be about flowers, hair and makeup, fashion, wedding themes, health & beauty, cakes, stationery, legal advice. If you would like your question answered by our experts, please email it to editor@your-sussex.wedding

 

Shine bright like a diamond

Shine bright like a diamond

Q. I'd really like my wedding ring to include some precious stones. How would this work?

A. Andrew Leggett says: These days, many wedding rings feature diamonds in one way or another. However, other types of stone are rarely used as they're far less durable and are easily scratched or scuffed through day-to-day wear. Diamonds are ranked at 10 on Mohs' hardness scale, whereas sapphires and rubies, rank at 9, so they're much softer – all other gemstones are softer still. This means that diamonds can only be scratched by other diamonds making them the only stone that's really suitable for everyday wear.

If your engagement ring features diamonds, it's wise to use more of a similar quality in your wedding band. Most people want their engagement ring to remain the focal point, so stone size is important here – if the diamonds in the wedding band are bigger than those in the engagement ring, the two will be competing for attention, rather than complementing one another. It makes sense to decide on the most appropriate width of band to put with your engagement ring, and then consider how diamonds could work within it.

With a custom-made ring you can decide on the number of stones, their size and quality, as well as how they are to be arranged. In fact, the subject of stones is just one element of the overall design and can be fully explored at a design consultation with a bespoke jeweller.

Andrew Leggett, Aurum Designer-Jewellers
www.aurumjewellers.com

 

Putting a ring on it

Putting a ring on it

Q. What are your top tips for picking out our wedding rings?

A. Andrew Leggett says: If you have an engagement ring, think about how it will look alongside a wedding ring. The more features the two share, the more they'll complement one another. Matching the materials, as well as the profiles is a good place to start. If your engagement ring doesn't have straight sides, a fitted wedding band will allow the two to sit comfortably together, minimising wear caused by them rubbing against one another. Dimensions too are key to achieving a unified look. A tenth of a millimetre, more or less, in width or depth, can make all the difference.

On the practical side, before you make your final purchase, consider whether it's suitable for the treatment it'll get. Someone with a manual job or with an active lifestyle needs a ring that is robust and hardwearing. Go for a tough material and perhaps also choose a surface like a hammered finish that will help to disguise any knocks and dents you put into it.

Remember though, it's quite possible that your ideal ring doesn't exist, so if you opt for a bespoke ring, you'll be able to get involved in the design process and your ring can be made just how you want it.

Andrew Leggett, Aurum Jewellers and Designers
www.aurumjewellers.com

 

With this ring...

With this ring...

Q. Sustainability is important to us. How is it possible to carry this through to our wedding rings?

A. Georgina Marfe says: This is a topic often discussed with our customers and is something we're passionate about. So our key piece of advice would be to look for a wedding ring supplier that's a member of the Responsible Jewellery Council. We proudly partner Brown & Newirth who've been official members for three consecutive years.

The RJC is the world's only global retail body for responsible jewellery through the mine to retail supply chain. In order to become a member a supplier must undergo an audit that looks into the materials, sources and supply chains for everything they use to create their jewellery. Wider human rights and environmental assessments also take place, making accreditation a very tough but special achievement.

If you'd like to know more about Brown & Newirth's latest sustainability commitments come along to our newly refurbished showroom for a chat with one of our team of expert consultants.

Georgina Marfe, Wakefields
www.wakefields.co.uk

 

Jewel of the aisle

Jewel of the aisle

Q. I'd like some stones in my wedding ring, and ideally a bit of colour. What would you suggest?

A. Andrew Leggett says: In recent years, diamond-set wedding rings have become increasingly popular with both brides and grooms, largely due to their durability. Your wedding ring will be subjected to a lifetime of wear, and diamonds are less likely than other stones to suffer damage. Fortunately, diamonds come in a range of colours. Natural, fancy coloured diamonds can be very expensive, but colour-enhanced diamonds are more affordable.

Sapphires and rubies are next to diamonds in terms of hardness, but are nevertheless much less hard wearing. A word of caution: if your engagement ring has no coloured stone, I'd be very wary of adding colour to your wedding ring. Most people want their engagement ring to be the focus of attention, and coloured stones in your wedding band tend to draw the eye away from it. However, if your engagement ring does feature a coloured stone, you could go for some small accent jewels of the same hue.

There are lots of stones available, and opting for a bespoke design will open up a great many opportunities that you're unlikely to find in ready-made versions. The ring pictured is a man's platinum band with white, yellow and blue diamonds.

Andrew Leggett, Aurum Jewellery
www.aurumjewellers.com

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