Ask the experts

Here is a selection of Q&As from Your Sussex Wedding magazine. If you would like your question answered by our experts, please email it to editor@your-sussex.wedding.

To view more Q&A's on a different topic, please select one from the list below.

Hot topic: Winter weddings

Our experts talk winter wonderland weddings

Bloomin' chilly

Bloomin' chilly

Q. How can I make my big day seasonal?

A. Bella Timbrell says: I must admit, when I think about winter flowers and foliage I don't always feel very inspired. But actually there's so much you can do to create your very own winter wonderland using a colour palette of red, cream, pink and burgundy. I'm a big fan of seasonal favourites ranunculus and anemomes but also love the romance of roses, especially as they're available all year round. Why not add teasels, rosehips or berries such as viburnum or hypericum? You could even try pine cones for a more rustic style! When it comes to foliage, bring out the silver of those frosty mornings with eucalyptus and senecio and mix with other greens like rosemary, pittosporum and ivy.

Pearls of wisdom

Pearls of wisdom

Q. How can I make my big day seasonal?

A. Richard Talman says: Winter weddings benefit from neutral and light colours so, unlike a summer wedding that can be an array of colour, the colder seasons are perfectly matched to white pearls, diamonds and white metals. This is featured here in this stunning bridal necklace, which could be adjusted in length to suit any bridal dress.

Full-on festive fun

Full-on festive fun

Q. How can I make my big day seasonal?

A. Kate & Kate says: We love a winter wedding! Snuggly venues, log fires, greenery, Christmas trees with baubles, fairylights and candles everywhere, mulled wine on arrival to warm everyone up!

Warmth is a must; think velvet, feathers and pashminas, plus a spare pair of outdoor shoes for the photos. Flowergirls and pageboys can have the look of magical little elves, and bridesmaids can look stunning in burgundy or scarlet.

As for the ceremony itself, pop a cracker on every seat to start things off with a bang and, of course, that means a paper hat on every head for full-on festive fun! A Christmas carol or well-known Christmas song sing-a-long really gets the ceremony going – Walking in a Winter Wonderland is one of our favourites.

Stick your vows inside giant husband and wife Christmas cards – so kitsch it's cool – and for the kiss, always have mistletoe at the ready. On exit, forget confetti, it's party poppers all the way! You're going out with a bang!

Winter warmers

Winter warmers

Q. How can I make my big day seasonal?

A. Caroline Laughton says: We think inspiration for a winter wedding breakfast lies in some warming spices, rich flavours and hearty dishes. Canapés with roast beef and horseradish pipette, a white pepper croute with stilton, prosciutto and honey drizzle and a hot spiced lamb meatball really fit the bill.

Starters might include a spiced squash soup or a fun sharing whole baked garlic and rosemary studded camembert with crunchy crudites.

For main course dishes, continuing the sharing theme, meat boards are a great option, with two meats portioned or carved and a choice of traditional or Mediterranean vegetables. A duo of sausages or a shortcrust pastry pie are always a winter winner or perhaps a stew with venison, smoked bacon and juniper berries might suit.

With so many puddings to choose from, a trio of desserts will cover all bases! You might like a theme such as salted caramel or clementine or just a selection of your favourites in miniature for your guests to enjoy.

If you're looking to dance the night away with some late-night nibbles on hand, we think wood fired pizzas hit the spot to complete the menu for your special winter wedding day.

Man with a plan

Man with a plan

Q. How can I make my big day seasonal?

A. Nick Henley says: Planning is key. It's important to be comfortable and prepare for the elements. I always let couples know how long they're going to spend outside ahead of time and advise them to bring a cover up or jacket. Shivering and skin peppered with goosebumps will make for uncomfortable looking photos! Plus, agreeing how a shawl, for example, can be incorporated to give a range of poses whilst keeping the couple warm will pay dividends later. Timing is critical with weddings in the latter part of the year as the light is lost earlier meaning there can be a clash between the breakfast and capturing those all-important images. Light falls very differently during the winter months, low light or a setting sun can create a glare making the couple squint or cause a lens flare. But it can be used to our advantage in creating some dramatic images. I will always visit the location at the same time a few days before to get a feel for how conditions will be.

Checklist:

♥ Come prepared to embrace the elements.

♥ Tell your photographer if you're feeling cold or would prefer a different location and don't tough it out as it will show in the shots.

♥ Have a realistic plan for the photos and remember that for group shots, you'll often be committing your guests to a trip outside without jackets.

♥ Finally work with your photographer and share ideas so that you incorporate any them into your photos.

East Sussex National Golf Club
RTFJ
The Ravenswood Hotel
ignature Wedding Show at Ascot Racecourse